July 30, 2016 – by Christine Williams

This post is not to promote conversions, but to highlight the fact that a prominent Muslim reporter for the Wall Street Journal was so repulsed by an act of jihad-by-the-sword that it became the final straw for him. He decided to leave Islam, now putting himself in the ranks of apostates — and he is an exceptionally brave public one at that.

Iranian Wall Street Journal reporter Sohrab Ahmari announced on Twitter that he was converting to Catholicism following the shocking jihad beheading of an 86-year-old priest during a mass in Normandy, France.

Two jihadis pledged allegiance to the Islamic State and its leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi before forcing the priest to his knees and slitting his throat.

They filmed it all; then took terrified nuns as hostage.

Ahmari said: “Muslims everywhere according to my sources are beginning to recognise that Islam cannot be both the religion of peace and an endless source of revolting acts of ritualised evil against the innocent. In protest, many feel the time for excuses is over, and that their very real longing for God can only be fulfilled elsewhere.”

This is a call for Muslims who call themselves moderate everywhere, especially those living in the West, to rise up and call it what it is: ritualised evil against the innocent in the name of Islam. Those Muslims who insist on screaming “Islamophobia” in the face of such evil only show themselves to be protecting jihadists. To repeat the words of Abdur-Rahman Muhammad, a former member of the International Institute of Islamic Thought (IIIT), who was at a group meeting in the early 1990s where they came up with the idea to use the word “Islamophobia” politically:

“This loathsome term is nothing more than a thought-terminating cliche conceived in the bowels of Muslim think tanks for the purpose of beating down critics.”


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