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Auschwitz Nazi death campAimee Herd (Oct 18, 2013)Eva and Miriam Mozes, who—at 10-years-old—were, along with their family, forced from their small village home in Romania, and taken to the Auschwitz Nazi death camp.

“No human being can be free—emotionally free and mentally free—without forgiving people who have wronged them.”

A CBN TV video details the life of twin sisters, Eva and Miriam Mozes, who—at 10-years-old—were, along with their family, forced from their small village home in Romania, and taken to the Auschwitz Nazi death camp.

Separated from her family, Eva describes how she and her sister determined to stay alive, amid the sights of children’s corpses on the ground. She made a “silent pledge” to do everything in her power not to join those lifeless bodies.

Eva says she and her sister, and the other children in the death camp knew, from within the first week, that the notorious “angel of death,” Josef Mengele, had likely murdered their families, and that they were only alive because Mengele wanted to use them.

According to the CBN report, Mengele performed horrific experiments on the children, and studied “the effects of drugs and poisons on twins using one as the human guinea pig; the other as the control.”

Following one experiment in particular, Eva became deathly ill, but, she notes in the interview, “I refused to die.”

After nine months, Russian troops liberated the prisoners of Auschwitz, and Eva and her sister, Miriam were set free—but not from the anger and bitterness that filled Eva’s heart for her captors.

“I was angry with everything; with God, the world and everybody,” said Eva.

It wasn’t until the 50th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, when Eva and Miriam revisited the terrible site of their childhood nightmare experience, that Eva was truly liberated in her heart.

“As I was standing by the ruins of the gas chamber, I was remembering all the people I must forgive. I was forgiving the Nazis, I was forgiving Mengele, I was forgiving the people who did the experiments. I was forgiving everybody because the fact that I had the power to forgive gave me an emotional freedom that was so exhilarating, so beneficial to me that I did not have to deal with ‘who did what to me, and why.’ Immediately, I felt that all the pain I was carrying on my little shoulders [was] lifted from me—that I was free, and I was no longer a prisoner of my tragic past.”

Now, Eva runs her own Holocaust Museum in Terre Haut, Indiana; her sister, Miriam died of cancer.

Eva notes what she’s learned from her experience, “No human being can be free—emotionally free and mentally free—without forgiving people who have wronged them.”

Watch the full video report by Clicking Here.


1 Response to “A Survivor of Auschwitz Recalls the Past Horrors and How the Power of Forgiveness has Set Her Free”

  1. 1 David B Keeffe

    I was fortunate to hear Ms. Kor relate her message in person, by far the most powerful tale of forgiveness this Catholic boy has ever witnessed.

    My three children are grandchildren of a survivor and in my opinion this message is the main lesson to come out of this horrendous chapter in man’s evolution.

    It is only with such forgiveness, which in no way equates with absolution, that the message of ‘Never Forget, Never Again’ becomes palpable and sustainable.

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